Potty Training Tips – Part 2

Potty Training Tips – Part 2

​Now you’ve done the prep work and your child shows signs of readiness (refer to Part 1 of Potty Training) — it’s time to ​get started potty training! Plan the day you are going to start. You will need to ​be able to ​devote a few days just to toilet training. You will need to have the right mindset. You will need to have all your patience and be ready to deal calmly with both successes and failures.​ It will be hard — be ready​. Keep your wits about you! 1) Use underwear We recommend putting underwear on children from the start of toilet training. Use the ones they picked out, remind them that they are special underwear, and say, “We want to try to keep the pee and poop out of them.”  Pull-ups tend to be too absorbent and may not be enough of a signal to your child when they have an accident. 2) Practice runs first and then look for clues Look for signs​ ​– squirming​ or ​“the pee pee dance” ​or ​suddenly stopping what they are doing​ ​– and say, “I think the pee or poop is ready to come out; let’s go sit!” and do a practice run. Remember​,​ do NOT ask “Do you have to go?” because your toddler will ​likely ​say no​. Sit for no longer than 5 minutes and ​don’t​ force your child to sit. If your child is successful​,​ you can hug and congratulate​ them,​ but don’t overdo it. If you overpraise ​your​ child, they​​ will be looking for a bigger and bigger reward each time and overdoing it can actually...
Ready for potty training?  Planning is key! – Part 1

Ready for potty training? Planning is key! – Part 1

No more diapers is such a great feeling for families! But as parents, we often wonder: h ow do we get there?! Toilet training can be frustrating and stressful so we’ll share some of our insights into how to make this as painless as possible. In this article, we’ll talk about potty training planning and preparation and then follow up with part 2 that will cover the tips when you are ready to start. In our practice, we have seen that the biggest mistake parents make is not doing the prep work. You will be surprised how much less painful toilet training can be with a few months of setting the stage. Yes, months. It’s a marathon, not a sprint! At around 18 months, start talking about it. Use all the words you might say at home, such as pee and poop. When you notice your child pooping in the diaper, voice the observation, “oh, I see you are pooping.” Or if they are urinating while they are getting in the tub say, “oh, look– you’re peeing.” This helps them associate the sensation with the words. Don’t ask “Are you peeing or pooping ? ” because that question may just leads to a toddler’s favorite word, which is NO! Change their diapers quickly after they go so they learn that it is uncomfortable to be in a dirty diaper and again say, “Oh, look, you pooped (or peed) and we need to clean you right up — doesn’t that feel better?” Soon they will learn t o not like a soiled diaper and may start coming to you to...

How to make bedtime with your toddler easier

Sleeping Tips For Toddlers How to make bedtime with your toddler easier – sleeping video part 2. Dr. Kaseta and Dr. Gannon, two pediatricians, share tips on how to get your toddler to sleep. Video Transcript Hi, I’m Dr. Suzanne Kaseta. And I’m Dr. Barbara Gannon. We are both pediatricians, and we are both moms. I have six children. And I have four children. Today we are going to talk about sleep. It’s so important to teach your children how to sleep. And as your children get older and they are toddlers, you can really teach them good habits about sleep as well. Children like to have choices. You pick the bedtime, and Dr. Kaseta often talks about, even as infants, you can have a seven oreight o’clock bedtime and start your routine then, and then continue that until they are toddlers. Then, you can tell them – You can pick the bedtime stories; you can pick two or three stories to go to bed with; or you can have one pillow; or pick your pajamas. So they have some control over the situation. They don’t like to feel like they aren’t in control. So give them choices that are really not about their bedtime. Because there has to be family rules about bedtime. Because children need to make choices but they have to be within limits. So the family rule can be the bedtime, but they can really dictate how you get to bed. They also like to use transition objects, for toddlers and into pre-schoolers, because – a blanket, a favorite stuffed animal – helps them transition from their...

How to get your baby to sleep

Sleeping Tips For Babies How to get your baby to sleep – part 1. Dr. Kaseta and Dr. Gannon, two pediatricians, will teach you the importance of sleep, as well as share tips on how to get your baby to sleep. Video Transcript Hi, I’m Dr. Suzanne Kaseta. And I’m Dr. Barbara Gannon. We are both pediatricians and we are both moms. I have six children. And I have four children. Today we are going to talk about sleep. It’s so important to teach your children how to sleep. It’s been dark for nine months in the womb. They have no idea that there is day and there is night! Children need to learn how to sleep, and it’s our job as parents to teach them. The first thing we want to talk about is the safety of sleep. Your child only needs a tight fitting sheet and a mattress in the bassinet or crib. There are no blankets; there are no bumpers; there are no toys in the crib. And this is really all about safety. We want to prevent crib death or sudden infant death syndrome. And you also want to put the baby on it’s back to sleep. Yes, the baby on their back, in their own crib. I just want to reemphasize that. Not in the parent’s bed. Or not in the swing. That brings us to using things to get your baby to fall asleep. We call them sleep props. They really interfere with the natural learning of how to fall asleep on their own, which is the healthiest thing for your baby. So, a...
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